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EV Training Hot-Spots in Black & White

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Havak

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blog-unovamap.jpgThroughout the Unova Region, there are various locations that make EV training your Pokémon significantly easier. This article will direct you to these locations and help you understand how to find the Pokémon required to give the EVs you need. As well as finding the Pokémon you need, I'll state their encounter rate and level range, so you'll know whether it's best to battle said Pokémon yourself, or simply switch to something stronger in order speed things up. The amount of EVs you gain from each battle will explained, so you'll know how many of each Pokémon you need to battle to gain that amount of EVs. Before you begin, though, make sure you check out our Introduction to EV Training article so you're 100% prepared.

HP

victini.png

Pokémon: Victini

Location: Liberty Garden

Encounter Rate: 100%

Level: 15

EVs: 3 HP

EVs per Battle

Pokérus / Macho Brace: 6 EVs

Pokérus + Macho Brace: 12 EVs

Pokérus + Power Item: 14 EVs

Victini can be re-battled as many times as you wish until captured.

stunfisk.png

Pokémon: Stunfisk

Location: Route 8, Icirrus City, Moor of Icirrus

Encounter Rate: 100%

Level: 15-35

EVs: 2 HP

EVs per Battle

Pokérus / Macho Brace: 4 EVs

Pokérus + Macho Brace: 8 EVs

Pokérus + Power Item: 12 EVs

Stunfisk is encountered at 100% while surfing in the above locations. However, some of the puddles you can surf on may freeze over during Winter.

Attack

lillipup.pngpatrat.pngfarfetchd.png

Pokémon: Lillipup, Patrat, Farfetch'd

Location: Route 1

Encounter Rate: 50% / 50%

Level 2-4 (15-55)

EVs: 1 Atk

EVs per Battle

Pokérus / Macho Brace: 2 EVs

Pokérus + Macho Brace: 4 EVs

Pokérus + Power Item: 10 EVs

Lillipup and Patrat inhabit Route 1 with a 50% encounter rate each, meaning you'll always get an Attack EV.

Swarm Warning: Farfetch'd can Swarm on Route 1. Luckily, it grants an Attack EV as well; however, its level will be significantly higher (15-55).

Defense

roggenrola.png

Pokémon: Roggenrola

Location: Wellspring Cave

Encounter Rate: 50%

Level: 10-13

EVs: 1 Def

EVs per Battle

Pokérus / Macho Brace: 2 EVs

Pokérus + Macho Brace: 4 EVs

Pokérus + Power Item: 10 EVs

Roggenrola has a 50% encounter rate in Wellspring Cave; however, having the Sturdy ability (along with the 50% chance of finding a Woobat instead) can make things quite time consuming.

venipede.pngsewaddle.png

Pokémon: Venipede, Sewaddle

Location: Pinwheel Forest

Encounter Rate: 20% / 40%

Level: 14-17

EVs: 1 Def

EVs per Battle

Pokérus / Macho Brace: 2 EVs

Pokérus + Macho Brace: 4 EVs

Pokérus + Power Item: 10 EVs

Venipede and Sewaddle give a 60% encounter rate when combined. You need to pay more attention when EV training in Defense, as nowhere in the game(s) guarantees Defense EVs at 100%.

Special Attack

litwick.pngelgyem.png

Pokémon: Litwick, Elgyem

Location: Celestial Tower

Encounter Rate: 100% (50% / 50%)

Level: 26-29

EVs: 1 SpA

EVs per Battle

Pokérus / Macho Brace: 2 EVs

Pokérus + Macho Brace: 4 EVs

Pokérus + Power Item: 10 EVs

Litwick has a 100% encounter rate on the second floor. Elgyem can also be found from the third floor onwards, with a 15%, 30%, and 50% encounter rate on the third, fourth, and fifth floors respectively. It also grants 1 Special Attack EV, but generally to save time you can just go to the second floor and know you'll only face Litwick. If you do go to the top floor, you have the 50% encounter rate of each Pokémon and you can use Fly to escape the tower once finished.

Special Defense

frillish.png

Pokémon: Frillish

Location: Route 4, Route 17, Route 18, Driftveil City, P2 Laboratory

Encounter Rate: 100%

Level: 5-25

EVs: 1 SpD

EVs per Battle

Pokérus / Macho Brace: 2 EVs

Pokérus + Macho Brace: 4 EVs

Pokérus + Power Item: 10 EVs

Frillish has a 100% encounter rate while surfing at the above locations. Driftveil City is usually the best location as it is near a Pokémon Center and more easily accessible.

Speed

basculin.png

Pokémon: Basculin

Location: Route 1, Route 3, Route 6

Encounter Rate: 100%

Leve: 5-30

EVs: 2 Spe

EVs per Battle

Pokérus / Macho Brace: 4 EVs

Pokérus + Macho Brace: 8 EVs

Pokérus + Power Item: 12 EVs

Basculin has a 100% encounter rate while surfing at the above locations.

Happy training!


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    • By DaWoblefet
      Welcome to part two of our series of articles about creating specialized EV spreads. In this section, we'll cover the "how-to" of making specialized EV spreads, broken up into two chunks. The first chunk covers how to use a damage calculator, and how to use it to do things like survive an attack 100% of the time, always KO an opponent’s Pokémon with an attack, or always outspeed a specific Pokémon. The second chunk covers two very basic tricks about how to get more stat points out of your EV spreads. If you're looking for what these EV things are or why we bother to make anything more complex than 252 / 252 / 4, check out part one of the series for the answers to those questions and more.
      Before We Leap Straight Into Everything…
      There's a few things that will help you understand the content of the article a bit better.
      "EVing a Pokémon" means "to give a Pokémon an EV spread" which means "to train a Pokémon a certain way to increase its stat points". We always assume that the opponent's Pokémon has 31 IVs and your opponent understands how to EV train. With guides like Huy's covering how to breed perfect Pokémon in ORAS and Simon and Mikoto Misaka's guide to capturing flawless legendary Pokémon in ORAS, you should count on your opponent bringing in flawless Pokémon to fight your own. When I talk about how much damage a Pokémon deals to the foe's Pokémon, I often use percentages instead of the actual numbers to show how much damage our Pokémon dealt to the opponent's. This is the same way Pokémon Showdown displays damage, and that's because it's easier to visualize a certain percentage of health rather than talk about the actual numbers most of the time. When doing damage calculations, you almost always disregard critical hits. Even though you can EV your Pokémon to survive an attack when it lands a critical hit, that only happens 1/16 of the time. Taking attacks well is good, but those extra EVs in bulk could have been used elsewhere to hit harder, be faster, or take attacks better on the physical or special side. Unless you're using a strategy that involves guaranteed critical hits, like Frost Breath or Focus Energy + Scope Lens, critical hits are too luck-based to include in damage calculations. Tournaments in VGC have used level 50 Pokémon even before the games auto-lowered the levels for you. At first, you might not suspect that there's much of a difference - after all, every Pokémon is still on an even playing field. However, it does affect damage calculations. Level 50: 252+ SpA Hydreigon Draco Meteor vs. 4 HP / 0 SpD Landorus-T: 142-168 (86 - 101.8%) -- 12.5% chance to OHKO
      Level 100: 252+ SpA Hydreigon Draco Meteor vs. 4 HP / 0 SpD Landorus-T: 273-322 (85.3 - 100.6%) -- 6.25% chance to OHKO
      As you can see, at level 100 Landorus-Therian takes about 1% less damage from Hydreigon's Draco Meteor. This might seem initially insignificant, but it actually means Landorus-T is OHKOed 1/8 of the time instead of 1/16 of the time by this Hydreigon's move at level 50. The way stats are calculated, a Pokémon's stats at level 50 aren't exactly half of what they'd be at level 100. Remember to use level 50 Pokémon in your damage calculations rather than level 100 Pokémon.
      Using a Damage Calculator
      Now that we've got the fundamentals out of the way, let's get into the fun stuff: using a damage calculator. Rather than simply tell you how to use one, you can follow along in the video to help see exactly what you're reading about! I've included timestamps in the article that go along with each point I cover in the video. Please note that when I mention "this particular team", it's a completely different team each time. I say "this particular team" to remind you guys that these EV spreads are tailored towards the goals of the "particular team" the Pokémon is on.
      0:23: Accessing Pokémon Showdown's Damage Calculator, created by Honko. Typing "/calc" at any time in any of Showdown's many chat rooms will also direct you to the calculator. There is an alternative damage calculator out right now with the new ORAS Mega Evolutions implemented into its code as well. While its creator, gamut, does do a fantastic of staying on top of user requests, I still personally prefer Honko’s calculator because it’s supported by Showdown.
      2:04: Choosing a Pokémon to use, remembering to set its level to 50. You can scroll down to select a Pokémon, or type the first few letters of a Pokémon's name and it will pop up. I recommend using the blank sets, as the EV spreads from OU, UU, Ubers, etc. are tailored to Smogon formats.
      4:14: Performing a damage calculation. This can be absolutely anything you want. Have fun playing around and seeing how much damage your attacks will do or how well your Pokémon can eat up attacks.
      7:19: Using the damage calculator to show the wide variety of damage an attack can do. In this example, we check how much damage Mega Mawile's Play Rough does to a Zapdos with no EVs anywhere, 252 HP EVs, and even up to 252 HP EVs, 252 Defense EVs, and a Bold Nature. When an attack does more than 100% damage to a Pokémon, it is guaranteed to be KOed by that attack, and when the maximum amount of damage is under 100%, you know that Pokémon can always survive that attack from full HP.
      9:10: See how damage Zapdos can do back to Mega Mawile, or in this case, how much damage Zapdos does to Mega Mawile before it attacks. I don't have any specific goals for my Zapdos's Special Attack right now, so I just play around with the numbers to show the wide range of damage it can do.
      10:07: Calculating the damage of a spread move, any attack that hits more than one Pokémon on the field. In VGC, which is purely Double Battles, make sure to click the Doubles tab in the middle of the screen to account for the spread move damage power reduction. You ONLY click the Singles tab if the opponent's Pokémon is the only one you're targeting – a Pokémon is still a target even if it dodges the attack due to missing, an immunity (e.g. Earthquake versus Talonflame), Protect, Telepathy, or anything similar. Here are some examples:
      You have a Landorus-Therian and Salamence versus an opponent's Ferrothorn. Landorus-T's Earthquake is a spread move here, so you click the Doubles tab when calculating damage. You have a solo Landorus-T versus a Rotom-Wash and a Ferrothorn. Landorus-T's Earthquake is a spread move here against Ferrothorn, so you click the Doubles tab. If you use Rock Slide with Landorus-T and Ferrothorn uses Protect, Rock Slide is still a spread move, and you click the Doubles tab to calculate damage against Rotom-W. You have a Landorus-T and a Life Orb Hydreigon versus a Druddigon and a Mega Mawile. Hydreigon moves first, uses Draco Meteor, and knocks out Druddigon, but Hydreigon is at low enough HP to faint from Life Orb recoil itself. Landorus-T then uses Earthquake, and Earthquake is NOT a spread move, because only Mega Mawile and Landorus-T are left on the field. If you wanted to run a damage calculation for this situation, you would click the Singles tab. 11:28: Comparing two attacks. You probably noticed that Zapdos's Heat Wave only does a bit more damage than Thunderbolt to Mega Mawile. Keep this in mind when attacking Mega Mawile. If you don't care about hitting both opponents with Heat Wave, Thunderbolt does very similar damage, but won't miss. There are all sorts of little quirks like this, and testing out your moves in the damage calculator helps you learn how much damage your attacks can do in a certain situation before you need to know that information mid-battle.
      14:26: Choosing an item. This is pretty self-explanatory. Some of the damage calculator's items are pretty irrelevant for the purposes of damage calculation, like Enigma Berry and Safety Goggles, so don't use them. Don’t give Mega Evolved Pokémon damage-increasing items, unless you're playing around with Ditto or Smeargle.
      15:13: Choosing an Ability. Only Mega Pokémon come with their Abilties on the blank set option. Don't forget to give Azumarill Huge Power, give Sylveon Pixilate, or give Breloom Technician. Like with items, there's no point in giving Pokémon Abilities they can't get, unless you're messing around with Skill Swap or Role Play shenanigans.
      16:12: Calculating with a Pokémon or move not currently implemented into the damage calculator. You'll usually only need to know this right after a new Pokémon game's release, when new information hasn't made its way into the damage calculator just yet. The quickest way to put in a new move is to use another move of the same type and category (physical or special). For example, if you wanted to see how much damage Blast Burn would do from your Mega Charizard Y, simply choose Eruption instead – they are both special Fire-type moves with 150 Base Power. To choose Pokémon that aren't in the damage calculator yet, use Bulbapedia's list of base stats and type in the Pokémon's correct base stats into the damage calculator. Alternatively, you can find the base stats of Pokémon by typing /dt Pokémon into one of Pokémon Showdown's chatrooms, with "Pokémon" being whatever Pokémon's base stats you want to check. For example, if I wanted information on Mega Salamence, I would type /dt Mega Salamence.
      Accomplishing Goals
      18:33: Surviving an attack 100% of the time. In the example, I show Latias surviving Choice Specs Sylveon's Hyper Voice, but it can be absolutely anything depending on what your goals are for that Pokémon on that particular team. To give an example, look at Aaron Zheng's (Cybertron) Gothitelle, which he used both during the World Championships in 2014 and to win the Philadelphia Regional soon after:

      Gothitelle @ Chesto Berry
      Ability: Shadow Tag
      EVs: 252 HP / 12 Def / 244 SpD
      Sassy Nature
      IVs: 0 Spe
      – Psychic
      – Rest
      – Heal Pulse
      – Trick Room
      Cybertron's Gothitelle was primarily used to abuse its Ability Shadow Tag to limit his opponent's switching options and to set up Trick Room for his slower Pokémon to move first. However, his Gothitelle was trained to survive a Choice Specs Dark Pulse from Hydreigon – and Gothitelle can't do anything back to Hydreigon, right? Aaron explains his thought process in his team report:
      Going back to the Hariyama+Gothitelle lead, it was great getting a free Trick Room up the first turn while taking about 90% worth of damage with Gothitelle, just to heal it all back up the following turn with Rest while Hariyama OHKOed the attacker.
      In our example, Latias could easily set up Tailwind and still be able to attack once, or be able to get two attacks off to weaken Sylveon or its partners. To find the EV spread, all you have to do is simply guess-and-check until you have the correct numbers you need. For basic EV spreads like these, maxing out HP first is usually a good place to start. Then, keep adding Defense or Special Defense EVs until you survive the attack.
      21:16: OHKOing or 2HKOing a Pokémon with an attack 100% of the time. In the example, you see that it only takes 68 Special Attack EVs to foil Azumarill's plans to use Belly Drum – either it won't have enough HP to set up Belly Drum, or you can be sure you'll OHKO Azumarill after it sets up Belly Drum. Since Thundurus's role on this particular team is to support the team with Thunder Wave speed control, we designed it to be bulky, but this little bit of offensive power helps Thundurus to secure a very important KO for this team.
      As another example from last year's World Championships, let's take a look at the Scrafty from Wolfe Glick's (Wolfey) 9th Place Team Report:

      Scrafty @ Lum Berry
      Ability: Intimidate
      EVs: 236 HP / 148 Atk / 108 Def / 12 SpA / 4 SpD
      Sassy Nature
      IVs: 0 Spe
      - Fake Out
      - Snarl
      - Drain Punch
      - Taunt
      While Snarl might be interesting to discuss when talking about Wolfey's Scrafty, let's take a look at his 148 Attack EVs. With this investment, Scrafty could 2HKO 4 HP Mega Kangaskhan with Drain Punch. However, the reasoning for this goal was more complex than just that:
      I knew that I wanted Scrafty to be able to deal with Kangaskhan, yet I couldn't decide how much attack to invest because of the wide range of bulk Kangaskhan is capable of using. For this reason, we chose to invest 148 Attack EV's, which always 2HKO's 4 HP/0 Defense Kangaskhan. The reason I thought this was so clever is I didn't actually care whether or not Scrafty 2HKO'd Kangaskhan: I just wanted to be able to tell how much bulk a Kangaskhan was running in a 2 out of 3 match easily. By using the minimum possible to guarantee the 2HKO on bulk less Kangaskhan, I was able to tell in a glance whether an opposing Kangaskhan was bulky or offensive; information that was incredibly valuable as it allowed me to judge how much Mawile's attacks would do or whether or not I could expect my Hydreigon to outspeed. Of course, there is a chance of a very low roll and me misjudging the opposing Kangaskhans bulk in theory, but every time I used this method to harbor a guess I ended up being correct.
      24:29: Outspeeding a Pokémon using the VGC '15 Speed tiers. In our example, Mamoswine was chosen for that particular team to serve as a way to get rid of troublesome Dragons, Landorus-T, and Thundurus. Looking at the Speed tiers, Mamoswine can reach a 198 Speed stat using the Adamant Nature and holding a Choice Scarf. However, Pokémon like Mega Sceptile, Greninja, and Mega Pidgeot aren’t particularly common for the team to face or difficult for Mamoswine’s teammates to defeat. After looking at Pokémon slower than Mamoswine, Jolly Mega Salamence seems to be the most annoying problem, but is 9 points slower than Mamoswine. Because we don’t care about anything in that Speed range, we can lower the amount of Speed EVs to give us more EVs for Attack or bulk. Since the Choice Scarf multiplies the holder’s Speed stat by 1.5x, we find the actual stat Mamoswine needs to reach by taking 190/1.5, which gives us 126.6666… We can’t have a decimal for a stat though. A 127 Speed stat would be required to outspeed Jolly Mega Salamence. Now all we have to do is find the magic number, which in this case is 212 Speed EVs.
      Yet another example from the 2014 World Championships is Ryosuke Kosuge's (gebebo) Mega Mawile from his 5th place team, which relied on outspeeding and outdamaging the opponent's team with options like Tailwind Aerodactyl and Choice Band Garchomp.

      Mawile @ Mawilite
      Ability: Intimidate
      EVs: 92 HP / 244 Atk / 4 Def / 4 SpD / 164 Spe
      Adamant Nature
      – Play Rough
      – Fire Fang
      – Sucker Punch
      – Protect
      Specifically, before Tailwind, Mega Mawile's 164 Speed EVs let it reach a 91 Speed stat. With Tailwind blowing behind his team, gebebo's Mega Mawile hit a 182 Speed stat – one point above max Speed Mega Lucario. This made Mega Mawile significantly speedy under Tailwind, being able to OHKO the likes of Garchomp, Hydreigon, and Mega Lucario instead of taking a chunk of damage before striking back.
      30:17: Underspeeding a Pokémon, and how to find the Speed stat of a Pokémon not on the Speed tiers. This example is reminiscent of the weather wars of 2012, when you would often find slow Tyranitar to make sure Sandstorm remained the permanent weather condition instead of the rain from Politoed's Drizzle. However, minimum Speed Politoed isn't on the VGC '15 Speed tiers – we have to figure it out ourselves. Most damage calculators (and Showdown’s teambuilder) come with built-in stat calculators, we can figure Politoed’s minimum speed. In this case, simply change Politoed's 31 Speed IV to a 0 Speed IV, and give it any Speed-lowering Nature you can think of. Now that we know Politoed's minimum Speed is 67, we just need our Tyranitar to have a Speed stat of 66, which is just a 0 IV in speed. Now Tyranitar will always underspeed Politoed to guarantee sand gets up, but still outspeeds other Tyranitar that might be using a Brave Nature and 0 Speed IVs. Similar to the same strategy Ray used in his winning team from the 2012 World Championships.
      Underspeeding the opposing Pokémon for weather wars isn't the only application of this concept. Sometimes, you'll want to underspeed your own Pokémon for some combos. Wolfey's team again provides a fantastic example of this concept, where he specifically gave his Mega Mawile a Speed stat of 64 with an Adamant Nature, 17 Speed IVs, and 4 Speed EVs.

      Mawile @ Mawilite
      Ability: Intimidate
      EVs: 252 HP / 132 Atk / 60 Def / 60 SpD / 4 Spe
      Adamant Nature
      IVs: 17 Spe
      - Play Rough
      - Iron Head
      - Protect
      - Sucker Punch
      Despite Mega Mawile being one of Wolfey's primary forms of offense in Trick Room, Wolfey chose not to go with a Brave Nature and 0 Speed IVs. Why, you ask? Well, Wolfey's Gothitelle had a Sassy Nature and 0 Speed IVs, so it reached a 63 Speed stat. If Mega Mawile and Gothitelle were on the field together in Trick Room, Gothitelle would always move first. This meant Gothitelle could use Psychic to soften up an opponent for an attack from Mega Mawile, or break a substitute using Gothitelle's weaker attack before following up with the more powerful Play Rough or Iron Head.
      Bringing It All Together
      34:18: Let's make an EV spread for a Rotom-Wash.

      Here are the goals we’ll try to achieve:
      Outspeed Adamant Bisharp so it can use Will-o-Wisp to halve the damage Rotom-W or its partner will take from Bisharp's move OHKO 4 HP Landorus-Therian with Hydro Pump Make Choice Specs Sylveon's Hyper Voice a 3HKO, including Sitrus Berry recovery To start off, using the Speed tiers we find out that Adamant Bisharp reaches a 122 Speed stat. To outspeed Bisharp, we need Rotom-W to reach a 123 Speed stat. This requires 132 Speed EVs.
      Next up, we want to OHKO 4 HP Landorus-Therian with Hydro Pump. After playing around with the numbers, it looks like 60 Special Attack EVs is the minimum amount of EVs it takes to accomplish this goal.
      Last, we want to make sure Sylveon's Choice Specs Hyper Voice is never able to knock out Rotom-Wash in two hits. Since we have a Sitrus Berry, we can automatically tack that recovery onto Rotom-W's max HP stat to save some time. Sitrus Berry recovers 1/4 of your HP, so take Rotom-W's HP stat (157) and divide it by 4. Then, add the result. In this case, we have 157/4=39.25, and 157+39.25=196.25. Wait a minute, a Pokémon can't have 0.25 of an HP, right? Nope. In Pokémon, if you see a decimal, you're almost always going to chop it off, or truncate it. Truncating isn't the same as rounding, though. If Rotom-W had 196.75 HP, then it'd still only have 196 HP, not 197.
      We know that our Rotom-W has 196 HP if you consider the Sitrus Berry. So, if we want to survive two Hyper Voices, each Hyper Voice would have to do less than half to Rotom-W's 196 HP. 196/2 is 98, so each Hyper Voice can only do at most 97 damage. Now all we have to do is invest enough EVs to make sure Sylveon's Hyper Voice only does 97 damage. After playing around with the numbers, 252 HP / 148 Special Defense with a Calm Nature accomplishes this goal.
      … or not. Unfortunately, while we did accomplish every goal on our list, we used up too many EVs! 132 Speed + 60 Special Attack + 148 Special Defense + 252 HP = 592 EVs, which is 84 more EVs than any Pokémon can have at once. So, what do we do now? Well, if we were just a few EVs over the 508 EV limit, we might be able to just compromise here and there and accomplish our goals "most of the time" instead of 100% of the time. 84 EVs is a lot, though, so that "most of the time" probably isn't going to be very consistent in the middle of a battle. We're going to have to change one of our goals completely.
      In this case, I've decided to change the Choice Specs Sylveon goal, as I feel this team has a better matchup against it than against Bisharp or Landorus-Therian. After thinking about it some more, I think making Ludicolo's Giga Drain a 3HKO would be a good idea. However, I'm not all that sure about what kind of EVs Ludicolo use. Do they use max Special Attack, or do they focus more on bulk to complement the Assault Vest? To find out what's popular on Ludicolo, we can look at popular sets from Nugget Bridge team reports. After glancing through the Ludicolo tag, you might notice Blake Hopper's (Bopper) Ludicolo spread from his 11th place World Championships team report was also featured on many high placing Regionals teams, like Talon's and majorbowman's:
      [sugimori name = ludicolo]
      Ludicolo @ Assault Vest
      Ability: Swift Swim
      EVs: 252 HP / 84 Def / 148 SpA / 4 SpD / 20 Spe
      Modest Nature
      – Scald
      – Giga Drain
      – Ice Beam
      – Fake Out
      Ludicolo's 148 Special Attack EVs with a Modest Nature allows it to OHKO 4 HP Garchomp 100% of the time with Ice Beam, but now we're going to turn this Ludicolo's popularity back at itself!
      It’s important to remember that this is Ludicolo’s popularity at the time this article was written. Perhaps at the time you’re reading this, nobody is using Ludicolo, or absolutely everybody is using it to counter a popular threat. I strongly recommend using recent, popular EV spreads from well-recognized or well-placing trainers in your damage calculations if you want to calculate against EV spreads you think will be reused in future tournaments.
      Just like with Sylveon, we use the Sitrus Berry trick to know our Rotom-W has 196 HP. And just like before, we want Ludicolo's Giga Drain to do 97 damage. After playing around with the numbers, 252 HP / 84 Special Defense with a Calm Nature seems to accomplish this goal using the minimum amount of EVs. While this is less EVs than before, though, it still seems that we're 24 EVs over the 508 limit. Let's try using 60 Special Defense EVs and see how much damage Rotom-W takes.
      The maximum damage Ludicolo can do to us with Giga Drain is 98. However, it can’t do 97 damage at all, and the rest of Ludicolo’s damage rolls wouldn’t deal enough damage to 2HKO Rotom-W. It would be unlikely to do 98 damage twice in a row. Since there are 16 damage rolls, to hit the same one twice would be 1/16*1/16 odds, or 1/256. That gives Rotom-W a 99.609375% chance to survive two Giga Drains. While it's not 100%, I'm pretty comfortable with those odds. Now all that's left to do is place the remaining 4 EVs into Defense, and we're finally done.
      252 HP / 4 Defense / 60 Special Attack / 60 Special Defense / 132 Speed, Calm Nature
      Outspeeds Adamant Bisharp OHKOes 4 HP Landorus-Therian with Hydro Pump Survives two Giga Drains from Bopper's Ludicolo when including Sitrus Berry recovery Level 50 Stats
      IVs/2 + EVs/8 should equal a whole number
      Remember how I mentioned at the beginning of the article about level 50 Pokémon doing a bit more damage than level 100 Pokémon? There's another difference between the two. If you check out other EV spread guides like Smogon's or Serebii's that talk about EV training Pokémon at level 100, you'll read that your EVs need to be evenly divisible by 4 to be efficient.
      We can use the same concept here with level 50 Pokémon. We'll say it has 31 HP IVs. Rather than explain the entire stat formula and why exactly the numbers are the way they are, we can use the IVs/2 + EVs/8 trick and get all the information we need.

      Plug in our numbers:



      Great, that's nice and even, just like we want it to be. Let's try taking out 4 EVs like before.

      Plug in our numbers:



      Round down the remaining decimal, adjust the EV investment.
      Plug in our numbers:



      We reached the same stat, but we saved 4 extra EVs.
      Here are some tips on how to save time with EV spreads:
      Play around with your EVs in Pokémon Showdown's teambuilder. Guess-and-check is a perfectly viable method to use for this; just make sure your level is 50, and then play around with your EVs until you have the same stat points as before while using less EVs. Remember that because most IVs are going to be 31, your EVs when divided by 8 just need to have a decimal of 0.5 following them. If you follow this method, you'll probably memorize the numbers you want to remember on your own. Alternatively, here's a list of every amount of EVs that works efficiently with 31 (odd-numbered) IVs: 4, 12, 20, 28, 36, 44, 52, 60, 68, 76, 84, 92, 100, 108, 116, 124, 132, 140, 148, 156, 164, 172, 180, 188, 196, 204, 212, 220, 228, 236, 244, 252
      When Your IVs Aren't 31
      With all this though, we've been assuming we live in a perfect world where all our IVs are 31. Though that is ideal, maybe you were in a rush to soft reset for Terrakion and settled for IVs of 31 HP / 24 Attack / 7 Defense / 12 Special Attack / 31 Special Defense / 31 Speed. Or maybe you have to use 30 IVs in some stats for a specific Hidden Power Type, like Sylveon with Hidden Power Ground or Thundurus with Hidden Power Ice. In these kinds of situations, we can still use our formula to help us out.
      Let's say I was planning to give that Terrakion I caught a basic 252 Attack / 252 Speed / 4 HP EV spread. Because I haven't changed the role Terrakion plays on my team, we still want to max out Speed and Attack. However, if you'll notice, Terrakion has a 24 IV in Attack. Let's see what happens if we invest 252 EVs in that stat:

      Plug in our numbers:



      We want our EVs when divided by 8 to equal a whole number, instead of leaving behind a decimal of 0.5. In this case, 248 EVs should do the trick.
      Plug in our numbers:



      Now, we can place our leftover 4 EVs in either Defense or Special Defense to make those leftover EVs more useful. Just like before, instead of hand-calculating your EV numbers every time, you can play around with the numbers in Showdown or look at this list of every amount of EVs that works with 30 (even-numbered) IVs:
      8, 16, 24, 32, 40, 48, 56, 64, 72, 80, 88, 96, 104, 112, 120, 128, 136, 144, 152, 160, 168, 176, 184, 192, 200, 208, 216, 224, 232, 240, 248
      Remember, this trick isn't a substitute for getting Pokémon with flawless IVs. With 248 Attack EVs, 24 IVs, and a Jolly Nature, Terrakion's Attack stat is 177, 4 less than it would have with a 31 IV in Attack (181).
      Example:
      Let's say my friend Xavier Liao (finally) just made himself an amazing EV spread for Heatran and wanted to show it off to see what I thought of it. He was a lucky man and managed to soft reset for a Heatran with 31 IVs in everything but Attack and with a Modest Nature. finally says his EV spread of 252 HP / 32 Special Attack / 16 Special Defense / 208 Speed outspeeds Adamant Bisharp, survives 4 Sp. Atk EV Rotom-W's Hydro Pump with enough HP to use Substitute afterwards, and has the rest in Special Attack for more firepower. Let's see if we can get any more stat points out of finally's EV spread.
      Since all of finally's IVs were 31, we can look at our first list.
      4, 12, 20, 28, 36, 44, 52, 60, 68, 76, 84, 92, 100, 108, 116, 124, 132, 140, 148, 156, 164, 172, 180, 188, 196, 204, 212, 220, 228, 236, 244, 252
      32, 16, and 208 are all not on this list. To fix this, we'll use the number immediately below finally's number on the list. In this case, 28, 12, and 204 are the numbers we want.
      252 HP / 28 Special Attack / 12 Special Defense / 204 Speed Since we took out 4 EVs from three stats, we now have 12 EVs to put somewhere else. In finally's case, he didn't have any specific goals with Special Attack other than additional firepower, so we can put 8 EVs there. Now we have 4 EVs left.
      252 HP / 36 Special Attack / 12 Special Defense / 204 Speed Since those 4 EVs would be wasted in any of the stats that already have EVs in them, we have two choices remaining: Attack or Defense. finally is only using special moves on his Heatran, so putting the extra 4 EVs into Attack would be pointless. We'll put the extra 4 into Defense.
      252 HP / 4 Defense / 36 Special Attack / 12 Special Defense / 204 Speed, Modest Overall, we managed to get +1 Defense point and +1 Special Attack point. It might not seem like much, but now we have two extra stat points that you didn't have before.
      Choosing a Nature
      We've been talking a lot about EVs, but what about Natures? Don't worry, those are super important too. Mathematically speaking, the Nature of your Pokémon multiplies one stat by 1.1 (110%) and multiplies another stat by 0.9 (90%). For example, the Adamant Nature increases your Attack stat by 1.1, but decreases your Special Attack stat by 0.9. This makes it ideal for Pokémon like Landorus-Therian, Bisharp, or Azumarill, who won't use their Special Attack stat and appreciate a boost to their already high Attack stats. There's a Nature that increases and decreases every stat except for HP, and you can check out a full list of them on Bulbapedia.
      Choosing a Nature is just like choosing anything else for a Pokémon – what am I trying to do with this Pokémon, and how can my Nature help accomplish that Pokémon's goals? Here's a few examples:

      My Mega Kangaskhan has Ice Punch, and I want to take Landorus-Therian by surprise who think they'll be able to survive a Double-Edge after Intimidate. Since I can't outspeed Choice Scarf Landorus-T no matter what I do, I'll settle for outspeeding a Jolly Landorus-T. After looking at the VGC '15 Speed tiers, I know Adamant Mega Kangaskhan only reaches a 152 Speed stat, but Jolly Landorus-T reaches a 157 Speed stat. Because of this, we choose the Jolly Nature, which increases Speed but lowers Special Attack. Our Mega Kangaskhan only has physical moves, so it doesn't mind a drop in Special Attack.

      I plan on getting my Mega Camerupt in under Trick Room and dealing as much damage as possible as quickly as I can. In this case, I choose the Quiet Nature. This is actually rather clever. Since we're using Trick Room, where the slowest Pokémon moves first, the lowering of Speed actually makes Mega Camerupt faster. The Quiet Nature has also boosted Mega Camerupt's Special Attack as well, and now its Heat Wave is even more dangerous. This trick doesn't just work on Mega Camerupt, though. Cresselia, Conkeldurr, Mega Mawile, Amoonguss, and others enjoy the drop in Speed that Natures like Brave and Sassy provide if you plan on bringing them in under Trick Room.

      I'm using an Infernape with a Focus Sash, and I decided I don't want to use Flare Blitz on it. After all, any time I use Flare Blitz, I take recoil damage, making my Focus Sash useless. Instead of using Iron Fist with Fire Punch though, I notice that even with no Special Attack EVs, Overheat does more damage to Mega Mawile than Fire Punch. In fact, Fire Punch can't get an OHKO while Overheat can! Since I still want the physical move Close Combat to OHKO Mega Kangaskhan and Tyranitar, I'll choose a Nature that doesn't lower either Attack or Special Attack. I also want a Nature that raises Speed to be able to outspeed Jolly Mega Kangaskhan, so Infernape can smash it with Close Combat. This leaves us with two choices: Hasty, which raises Speed but lowers Defense, or Naive, which raises Speed but lowers Special Defense. We're holding a Focus Sash on Infernape, so we survive any attack that would knock it out in one hit. To figure out which Nature to use, look at your team and determine what physical or special attacks might come Infernape's way, especially attacks that Infernape resists type-wise. Then, experiment with and without Hasty / Naive against those attacks in the damage calculator, and see if adding the Nature makes a 2HKO more likely to occur than a 3HKO.
      Boosting the Highest Base Stat
      Usually with Natures, you're going to want to boost your highest base stat. This makes sense mathematically, because 110% of a bigger number will be larger than 110% of a smaller number. However, while you might get more stat points overall by doing this, sometimes it's better to use a different Nature. How do you know when?
      Your Pokémon can't hit a certain Speed stat without using a Speed-raising Nature. Your Pokémon can't hit a particular defensive or offensive stat without a boosting Nature. These two points might sound the same, but the first exception shows up a lot more often than the second. After all, we used Speed-boosting Natures in two of the examples above. Knowing how fast and slow your Pokémon are is incredibly important knowledge to have during battle.
      Example:
      finally is back with an EV spread for his Choice Scarf Landorus-Therian. With an EV spread of 124 HP / 252 Attack / 132 Speed and a Jolly Nature, Landorus-T outspeeds max Speed Choice Scarf Smeargle, which means it also outspeeds Timid Mega Manectric. finally then placed 252 EVs in Attack to deal as much damage as possible, and had enough EVs left for HP to survive some random non-STAB Ice Beam and Hidden Power Ice thrown its way.
      However, finally forgot that Landorus-T's base Attack is much higher than its base Speed. Don't be fooled just because his Landorus-T is holding a Choice Scarf and is super fast – it doesn't need a Jolly Nature here.
      The quickest way to see if you can get more stat points by switching your Nature is by writing down how many EVs it takes to reach your desired stat points with both Natures. finally's Landorus-T has a 197 Attack stat and a 140 Speed stat (Smeargle reaches a 139 Speed stat, so if both are holding Choice Scarves, Landorus-T would be faster). Let's see how many EVs it takes to reach those stats with both a Jolly and an Adamant Nature.
      Jolly Nature: 252 Attack EVs, 132 Speed EVs. Total EVs: 384 EVs Adamant Nature: 116 Attack EVs, 228 Speed EVs. Total EVs: 344 EVs Switching to an Adamant Nature not only gave Landorus-T the same stat points as before, but there's now 40 extra EVs to place somewhere else. It also just so happens that putting the rest of the EVs in HP allows you to survive a Rotom-W's 0 Sp. Atk EV Hydro Pump 15/16 of the time. Our final EV spread is this:
      164 HP / 116 Attack / 228 Speed, Adamant Nature
      Overall, we managed to get +5 HP and +1 Attack, but we could have placed those extra 5 stat points anywhere we wanted. Switching Natures is often times the best way to get extra stat points.
      Conclusion
      This is the core of creating every specialized EV spread possible, and I hope you'll be able to create some of your own specialized EV spreads to get an advantage in battle. However, this isn't everything. Keep your eyes peeled for part three, where you can find a ton of specific tricks and shortcuts to really squeeze out every stat point from the EV spreads you create.
      I'd like to give special shoutouts to some fantastic people who helped with the creation of parts one and two of this series.
      Ansel Blume (Stats). After we first started talking post-Worlds 2013, we made so many personal advancements with EV spread creation that it was crazy. For this series in particular, Stats put up with me bombarding him with example ideas and offered some fantastic examples himself. Cory. Unique to this list because I can actually go over to his house if I want help with something, Cory was extremely instrumental in teaching me how to use video and audio editing programs for the YouTube video. Without his help, I probably would have been done with the video in about March. He's more of an overall gamer than a Pokémon nerd like myself, so if you'd like to watch some good Let's Plays or check out his skills on Guitar Hero, check out his YouTube channel. Ashley Haramaki (Cometkins), for creating the stunning article artwork. I continue to be impressed by the amazing work she can create. Tommy Yee (tlyee61), for reminding me to mention gamut's damage calculator and helping develop the series' name. Xavier Liao (finally), for giving me permission to use him as an example in the article.
    • By DaWoblefet
      If you've just started to battle competitively, then you might have seen players talking about these weird things called EVs. Perhaps you noticed them in Pokémon Showdown's teambuilder. Luckily, Nugget Bridge already has basic guides about EVs: this one explains what they are, while this one explains how to get them in-game. This article is different from those two, though: here, I'll discuss how to use EVs to give you an advantage in battle.
      Introduction to Stat Points
      Effort values (EVs), individual values (IVs), and the nature of a Pokémon all contribute towards a Pokémon's stat points. Do you remember that time when your Pokémon barely hung on during a battle, or when you let out a huge sigh of relief after barely knocking out an opposing Pokémon? To make these advantageous situations more common, players want their Pokemon to have as many stat points as possible. This is part of the reason why Pokémon like Cresselia, Landorus-Therian, and Mega Evolutions are so inherently powerful—they have naturally high overall stats, known as base stats. Though you might see the term "base stats" used in-game, especially during Super Training, don't be fooled—those are actually EVs. Back in Generation III when EVs were first introduced, there was no in-game text to tell exactly what EV-affecting items such as Macho Brace or Protein were for—their item texts were "promotes growth" and "raises the Attack stat". Due to this, the term "effort values" was created. When the term "base stats" is used, it refers to the natural potential of any particular Pokémon: the stats a Pokémon has due to its species, essentially a species-specific starting point. If you'd like to check out a list of base stats, Bulbapedia has a nice list of every fully evolved (and Mega Evolved) Pokémon's base stats.
      Choosing an EV Spread
      Let's say I have a Landorus-Therian, and I want it to do as much damage as possible, as quickly as possible. I could give Landorus-T a very basic EV spread of 4 HP / 252 Attack / 252 Speed. A Pokémon can have a maximum of 252 EVs in any one stat, and can only have 508 EVs total, so I simply maximize its Attack and Speed while placing the leftover EVs in HP. This is a perfectly viable way to make EV spreads; just maximize two stats, and you've got a Pokémon that's especially strong in two stats.
      However, this approach doesn't always work; take a look at Cresselia, a popular bulky Pokémon. I could give Cresselia an EV spread of 252 HP / 252 Defense / 4 Special Defense, and it would handle physical attacks such as Mega Kangaskhan's Double-Edge and Bisharp's Knock Off pretty well. But if I do so, special attacks such as Aegislash's Shadow Ball and Hydreigon's Dark Pulse will deal heavy damage to Cresselia, so perhaps maximizing Special Defense instead of Defense is the way to go. This Cresselia also carries Psyshock and Ice Beam, and maximizing Special Attack would allow it to possibly pick up important KOs. What spread should I choose?
      Remember, Pokémon aren't forced to maximize two stats! For example, I could easily give Cresselia a spread of 252 HP / 100 Defense / 156 Special Attack—all 508 EVs are still being used. However, these seem like arbitrary numbers; who knows what they do? Why not just take 508, divide it by 6, and place 84 EVs in every stat? Shouldn't that make a Pokémon's stats balanced? Well, doing so is possible, but is typically unoptimal. When damage calculators and teambuilders exist, there isn't any reason to randomly distribute EVs. This process can be done very precisely; players can invest exactly the necessary amount of EVs to accomplish a goal, and then spend the savings elsewhere. It isn't just for Cresselia, either—any Pokémon can be specifically trained to accomplish multiple goals with just a single EV spread.
      Why Bother?
      It may seem as if complex EV spreads aren't worth the time needed to develop them. The gains are often small—sometimes only a couple of stat points. As such, new players often believe that the ability to create solid EV spreads is relatively useless. However, this is simply not true; games are won and lost on single points of health. By maximizing returns from EVs, these situations can be beneficial more often.
      Don't get me wrong. Learning how to make predictions, manage odds to minimize bad luck, create win conditions, form a game plan at Team Preview, teambuild, and most importantly practice are all important skills that successful players have. Creating EV spreads falls under the teambuilding category, and it certainly doesn't encompass its entirety. Even if a player learns every advanced strategy, the ability to apply those skills in battle is what truly matter. Pokémon battles are won by the player who picks up four KOs, not the player with the fanciest EV spread. It's telling that Sejun Park, the most recent World Champion, has used simple 252/252 spreads on many of his Pokémon. As can be seen from his team report, he chose these spreads because they fulfilled his goals perfectly. However, ignoring the benefits of using complex EV spreads is just as silly as solely focusing on them. There is a balance, but it is different for every player.
      With that being said, why not just copy an EV spread from a top player? You can, of course, but consider this: when top players create EV spreads, they have specific goals in mind for that Pokémon which are typically team-specific. Let's take a look at two Hydreigon: one from 2014 US National Champion Alex Ogloza's (Evan Falco) winning team, and one from Worlds 9th place finisher and LCQ qualifier Wolfe Glick's (Wolfey) team.

      Hydreigon @ Choice Specs
      Ability: Levitate
      EVs: 84 HP / 12 Def / 236 SAtk / 4 SDef / 172 Spd
      Nature: Modest
      – Dark Pulse
      – Draco Meteor
      – Flamethrower
      – Earth Power
      Alex's Choice Specs Hydreigon dealt tons of damage to Pokémon such as Aegislash, Kangaskhan, and Rotom formes, sometimes even being able to OHKO them. At the time, Hydreigon's arch-nemesis was Garchomp, but Alex's team carried two Pokémon that could OHKO Garchomp with Ice Beam before it could move: Choice Scarf Politoed and Swift Swim Ludicolo. This meant that Alex's Hydreigon could afford to invest heavily into Special Attack.

      Hydreigon @ Life Orb
      Ability: Levitate
      EVs: 12 HP / 108 Def / 132 SpA / 4 SpD / 252 Spe
      Timid Nature
      - Flamethrower
      - Dark Pulse
      - Draco Meteor
      - Protect
      But wait! Wolfe used a very similar team to Alex; he also had Politoed and Ludicolo. So why did he decide to use maximum Speed instead? Here's his reasoning:
      I decided to use Timid with maximum Speed to beat other Hydreigon. If I ran into an opposing Scarf Hydreigon that KOed my Hydreigon with Draco Meteor, odds were that they would be stuck at lower and lower Special Attack due to Gothitelle's Shadow Tag, so it could essentially be considered a positive trade even if my Hydreigon was KOed. For this reason, Hydreigon+Gothitelle was a decent lead when I expected my opponent to lead Hydreigon, as few things could OHKO Goth and I would be able to take a quick Pokémon lead.
      Wolfe's Hydreigon allowed him to efficiently remove opposing Hydreigon from the game, since they were a major threat to his Gothitelle. This spread also does other cool stuff, such as allowing Hydreigon to OHKO every Rotom with Dark Pulse and Draco Meteor, as well as letting Hydreigon withstand a Dragon Claw from Garchomp and Life Orb recoil. Wolfe chose this EV spread because he recognized a weakness (opposing Choice Specs Hydreigon) and adjusted his own Hydreigon's spread to help manage that weakness. Although concepts and ideas from historical EV spreads can be beneficial, it remains important to tailor each Pokémon's EV spread to its surrounding team and metagame. There isn't a singular "best EV spread" for any Pokémon.
      Creating Your Own Goals
      You too can do what Alex and Wolfe did! Consider the role of each Pokémon on your team, and then consider how you can create an EV spread that either covers your team's weaknesses or supplements its strengths. Typically, there are three ways to accomplish this via EVs:
      Surviving an opposing Pokémon's attack, or a common combination of attacks Outspeeding a specific Pokémon (or outslowing for Trick Room) Picking up specific KOs on opposing Pokémon. You don't have to make goals as soon as you build the team. It's definitely alright to practice with 252/252 spreads, then create goals as you discover the team's weaknesses. In fact, it's encouraged! Once you understand how the team operates, you can make adjustments to your moves, items, EV spreads, and even Pokémon.
      When creating your goals, don't forget that 252/252 can be a very effective EV spread. If your goals simply involve hitting hard and hitting fast, don't hesitate to use 252/252 just because it's simple.
      Don't create too many goals for any single Pokémon to handle. Sometimes, not all goals are simultaneously accomplishable; additionally, having too many defensive goals can kill offensive potential. One Pokémon doesn't have to do everything on the team—that's what its teammates are for! When you set a defensive goal, make sure that goal is meaningful: that Pokémon should be able to deal significant damage to its specified opponent or provide important support, such as Trick Room.
      EVing Against the Metagame
      Choosing which goals you want your Pokémon to accomplish not only is determined by your team's strengths and weaknesses, but also by the metagame itself. If Mega Mawile is very rare, then investing enough EVs to withstand Mega Mawile's Play Rough is kind of silly, isn't it?  If I think Adamant Landorus-Therian is going to be everywhere, I'll give my Hydreigon enough Speed EVs to reach 144 Speed so I can smash it with Draco Meteor before it moves. However, if I end up playing against Choice Scarf Landorus-T, the extra Speed I gave my Hydreigon becomes meaningless and could have been better used elsewhere.
      The problem with EVing against the metagame is simple: it's impossible to know what the opposing Pokémon are until the battle starts. This is especially true with the Speed stat, because a difference of a single point means just as much as dozens. "Speed creeping" is a term some players use for this phenomenon, in which players attempt to have their Pokémon outspeed opposition by a single point of Speed. In VGC 2014, this occured to Rotom. The season started out with Rotom commonly investing only 4 Speed EVs. As it progressed, players began to attempt to win the tie with 12 Speed EVs. As that became common, players bumped up to 20, then 28, then 36, and on and on until the tradeoffs became too big. Speed creeping players sometimes found their Rotom with 36 Speed EVs outspeeding an opposing Rotom with only 4 Speed EVs! As such, top players began to avoid Speed creeping entirely; Markus Stadter (13Yoshi37) gave his reasoning as such in his Worlds team report:
      Let's take a look at Speed: with Speed, it is dichotomous: your Pokémon is either slower or faster than the opponent's. As such, there is much more potential for wasting EVs in Speed because of the fact that there are only two steps. There is no damage roll. Let's take a second and compare my Nationals spread to the “standard” 252/252 Jolly Kangaskhan:
      Mine: 207 HP, 181 Atk, 121 Def, 133 SpDef, 125 Speed
      Standard: 181 HP, 177 Atk, 120 Def, 120 SpDef, 167 Speed
      So that means that my Kangaskhan had +26 HP, +4 Atk, +1 Def, +13 SpDef at the cost of -42 Speed. Now what this means is that my Kangaskhan had 44 total stat points more than other Kangaskhan at the cost of going second to some Pokémon. Now if you take a look at common Speeds [from the VGC ‘14 metagame] and common EV spreads, I am sure you will realize that there is not all too much in between 125 and 167 Speed that is worth outspeeding, except for Pokémon such as Smeargle, bulky Charizard-Y and other bulky Kangaskhan. The latter two could also be 167 Speed should they decide to run maximum Speed, so you couldn't be sure whether your Kangakskhan would outspeed or speed tie even with maximum Speed. And my team had plenty of ways to deal with Smeargle, so I saw no need to outspeed it.
      Since Markus felt that he had answers to threats between 125 and 167 Speed, he saw no reason to heavily invest in Speed when the EVs could be used elsewhere.
      However, Worlds is a much different event compared to Premier Challenges and Regionals. There are new and inexperienced players using strange gimmicks and a variety of strategies. Due to this, players will often use safe and bulky EV spreads or fast and aggressive ones; these are generally good against a wide range of opponents. Even so, the metagame must be taken into consideration. For example, the likelihood of encountering special Tauros is negligible and Defiant Tornadus isn't legal, so preparing for those threats is rather silly. These are both extreme examples, of course, but there are plenty of more common adaptations that can only be picked up through practice. Perhaps using 20 Speed EVs is a good idea on Rotom, or perhaps it isn’t. It all depends on what other players are using.
      Keep in mind that this concept is good for teambuilding as well. EV spreads aren't the only way to adapt to the metagame—Pokémon themselves work too. Don't know what's popular? Check out the Reports section on Nugget Bridge for EV spreads used by top players, and keep an eye out on the forums for discussion of EVs. The Global Link usage statistics are also helpful in figuring out what's being used right now.
      Conclusion
      Where's the how-to, you might ask? Well, this article is mainly the "what" and "why" of EV spreads—look out for part two, where the "how" will be discussed. There, you'll learn how to use a damage calculator as well as the basics of getting the most out of your EVs.
      Article art created by Cometkins for Nugget Bridge. View more of her artwork on her Nugget Bridge forums thread.
    • By Gonzo
      The release of Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire is just around the corner so I'd like to introduce you to the EV training hotspots in the new games! Don't know what that means? Check out our previous guide.
      Below are the Pokémon's locations, levels, encounter rate and method of encounter. Also provided is the EV gain from each battle as well as calculations for modifiers so you'll know exactly how many EVs you'll get. For now, the guide consists of hordes only and will be updated once the full games are released. The data we have does not provide the names of locations, so these are (hopefully) correct guesses. If not, they'll be updated when ORAS is out.
      1. Changes & Basic Information
      Changes from 5th Gen

      The maximum amount of EVs in a single stat prior to XY was 255. In the 6th generation of games, it was reduced to 252, so now you don't have to worry about going over when maxing out a single stat.
      Horde encounters are the fastest way to EV train your Pokémon. Use Sweet Scent in an area to trigger a horde encounter.

      Modifying EV Gain

      Pokérus - doubles EVs gained, can be combined with Macho Brace and Power Items
      Macho Brace - doubles EVs gained, halves the holder's Speed, can be combined with Pokérus
      Power Items - give 4 additional EV points to the corresponding stat, halves holder's Speed, can be combined with Pokérus

      Calculations for EVs per Pokémon
      Don't forget to multiply by 5 for horde encounters!
      Base 3 points:

      Pokérus / Macho Brace: 6 EVs
      Pokérus + Macho Brace: 12 EVs
      Pokérus + Power Item: 14 EVs

      Base 2 points:

      Pokérus / Macho Brace: 4 EVs
      Pokérus + Macho Brace: 8 EVs
      Pokérus + Power Item: 12 EVs

      Base 1 point:

      Pokérus / Macho Brace: 2 EVs
      Pokérus + Macho Brace: 4 EVs
      Pokérus + Power Item: 10 EVs

      2. Hordes
      It seems Game Freak has understood our frustrations with running into the wrong Pokémon while training and given us at least one location with a 100% encounter rate for each stat. We've listed them below with alternatives in case there are hazards in the way! As always, this list will be updated as we find even more efficient ways of doing things. These are all hordes so you want to use Sweet Scent or Honey to attract them.
      HP

      Location: Rusturf Tunnel
      Encounter Rate: 100%
      Level: 5
      EVs: 1 HP each
      Attack

      Location: Mt. Pyre (cemetery area)
      Encounter Rate: 100%
      Level: 15
      EVs: 1 Atk each
      Defense

      Location: Route 111
      Encounter Rate: 100%
      Level: 11
      EVs: 1 Def each
      Note that Sweet Scent and Honey actually work in Sandstorm unlike in previous games!
      Special Attack

      Location: Route 119
      Encounter Rate: 100%
      Level: 13
      EVs: 1 SpA each

      Location: Route 113
      Encounter Rate: 95%
      Level: 9
      EVs: 1 SpA each
      Special Defence

      Location: Route 115
      Encounter Rate: 100%
      Level: 10
      EVs: 1 SpD each
      Speed
      or 
      Location: Route 104 (North - Wingull, South - Taillow)
      Encounter Rate: 100% combined
      Level: 2
      EVs: 1 Spe each
      Note: the route is divided into two parts by Petalburg Woods. Southern part of the route has Taillow hordes, Northern has Wingull hordes.
      As soon as the full games are released, we'll expand the guide with more methods. Thanks to Project Pokémon for providing us the data to create this guide with and good luck with your EV training!
       
    • By Gonzo
      Hello! My name is Konrad "Gonzo" Janik also known as your favourite EV training aid! This time, I want to share with you a list of good hotspots for Pokémon X and Pokémon Y. The code of the games cannot be decrypted yet, so I am not listing any Pokémon introduced in 6th Generation games because their EV yields remain unknown. The rarity of listed Pokémon is estimated and not 100% precise. Unfortunately, it is all we can get so far. This guide will be updated as soon as we get more information.
      I stated Pokémon's locations, their approximate levels, encounter rate (well, not really) and method of encountering. I also put EV gain from battling each Pokémon and calculations for EV gain modifiers so you'll know exactly how many EVs you'll get. A new type of wild Pokémon encounters -- horde battles -- are also listed. There are many other hordes, but I picked the most common ones, made of a single Pokémon species with the lowest possible levels. The guide is divided into four sections: Introduction, Hordes, Friend Safari and alternative methods.
      1. Introduction
      Important changes in EV Training compared to older games:

      The maximum amount of EVs in a single stat prior to XY was 255. In 6th Gen it was reduced to 252, so now you don't have to worry when maxing out a single stat.
      Horde encounters are the fastest way to EV train your Pokémon.

      Ways to Modify EV Gain:

      Pokerus - doubles EVs gained, can be combined with Macho Brace and Power Items
      Macho Brace - doubles EVs gained, halves holder's Speed, can be combined with Pokerus
      Power Items - give 4 additional EV points to a corresponding stat, halves holder's Speed, can be combined with Pokerus

      In XY, you can find Macho Brace lying on the ground at Route 15, Power Weight (+HP), Power Bracer (+Atk), Power Belt (+Def), Power Lens (+SAtk), Power Band (+SDef) and Power Anklet (+Speed) can be purchased in Battle Maison (Kiloude City) for 16 BP each.
      Calculations for EVs per Battle (Don't forget to multiply by 5 for horde encounters!):
      Base 3 points:

      Pokérus / Macho Brace: 6 EVs
      Pokérus + Macho Brace: 12 EVs
      Pokérus + Power Item: 14 EVs

      Base 2 points:

      Pokérus / Macho Brace: 4 EVs
      Pokérus + Macho Brace: 8 EVs
      Pokérus + Power Item: 12 EVs

      Base 1 point:

      Pokérus / Macho Brace: 2 EVs
      Pokérus + Macho Brace: 4 EVs
      Pokérus + Power Item: 10 EVs

      Tips:

      Avoid Pokémon introduced in 6th Generation when EV training, as their EV yields are currently unknown.
      If you need simple 252/252/4 spreads, use Hordes. Using vitamins is unnecessary - two Horde encounters give you the same amount of EVs as 10 Vitamins.
      If you need a more complicated EV spread, use Hordes + Friend Safari or find wild Pokémon that can give you the amount of EVs needed.

      2. Hordes
      In XY, if you use Sweet Scent or Honey, you have 100% chance to encounter a horde. A horde is a group of 5 Pokémon at a level around one half of the Pokémon you can encounter at the same location in regular one-on-one encounters. Method is not listed as this works in tall grass and caves only. Recommended for fast and easy maxing stats.
      HP

      Location: Route 5
      Encounter Rate: common
      Level: 5
      EVs: 1 HP per each
      or:

      Location: Connecting Cave
      Encounter Rate: common
      Level: 7
      EVs: 1 HP per each
      Attack

      Location: Route 14
      Encounter Rate: common
      Level: 16
      EVs: 1 Atk per each
      or:

      Location: Route 19
      Encounter Rate: common
      Level: 24
      EVs: 2 Atk per each
      In case it's raining on Route 14 or 19, you can't use Sweet Scent and Honey to encounter hordes. Alternatively use:

      Location: Frost Cavern
      Encounter Rate: common
      Level: 20
      EVs: 1 Atk per each
      Defence

      Location: Route 10
      Encounter Rate: common
      Level: 11
      EVs: 1 Def per each
      or:
      /
      Location: Route 18, Terminus Cave
      Encounter Rate: common/uncommon
      Level: 23/23
      EVs: 1 Def per each/2 Def per each
      Special Attack

      Location: Frost Cavern
      Encounter Rate: Common
      Level: 20
      EVs: 1 SpAtk per each
      Smoochum horde can be found in Frost Cavern as well. It's very rare, but the EV yield is the same as Vanillite's, so you can just use them if you find them.
      Special Defence

      Location: Route 7
      Encounter Rate: common
      Level: 6
      EVs: 1 SpDef per each
      Speed

      Location: Route 8
      Encounter Rate: common
      Level: 9
      EVs: 1 Speed per each
      Taillow horde can be found on Route 8 as well. It's very rare, but the EV yield is the same as Wingull's, so you can just use them if you find them.
      In case it's raining on Route 8, you can't use Sweet Scent and Honey to encounter hordes. Alternatively, use:

      Location: Connecting Cave
      Encounter Rate: common
      Level: 8
      EVs: 1 Speed per each
       
      3. Friend Safari
      After you beat Elite 4, you'll gain access to Kiloude City where you can find Friend Safari. Each of your 3DS friends generates three Pokémon of one type that can be encountered there. At the beginning, you can find just two species, and a third can be found after your friend beats the Elite 4, so non-Pokémon 3DS players will give you just two Pokémon. The list of Pokémon depends on Friend Codes you have, so after you go and discover your friends' species, just check their EV yields. The best way to do this is to use Bulbapedia's, Serebii's or Veekun's Pokedex, as all of them list the EVs you can get from beating specific Pokémon. This method is recommended for adding smaller amounts of EVs, impossible to get via Hordes.
      4. Alternative Methods
      (this section will be expanded when we have accurate encounter rates)
      Poke Radar
      If you don't want to use Hordes or Friend Safari, you can try something old-fashioned. Finding random Pokémon in grass quite inconvenient, so you can try using Poke Radar to chain specific Pokémon with desired EVs. When 100% accurate encounter rates are found, I'll expand this section. For now, I need to leave you with the idea.
      Fishing
      Attack

      Location: Route 3
      Encounter Rate: 100% combined
      Level: 25
      EVs: 1 Atk per each
      Rod: Good Rod
      Speed
      /
      Location: Route 3/Route 8
      Encounter Rate: 100%
      Level: 15
      EVs: 1 Speed
      Rod: Old Rod
      Magikarp is on Route 3, Luvdisc is on Route 8
      Surfing
      Special Defence

      Location: Route 8
      Encounter Rate: very common
      Level: 20-30
      EVs: 1 SpDef
      The other Pokémon is Wailmer with very low encounter rate. In case you find it, just run away.
      Speed
      /
      Location: Frost Cavern (outside)
      Encounter Rate: 100% combined
      Level: 38-40
      EVs: 2 Speed per each

      That's all we can get so far. I'll keep an eye on any EV Training related information and will update the guide as soon as possible. Meanwhile, good luck with your EV training!
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